Olive Lilian Creswell Haynes

Painted portrait of Sister Olive Haynes

Rank

Sister

Roll title

Australian Army Nursing Service

Convoy ship

SS Kyarra

The attestation papers of Sister Olive Haynes.

Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: B2455, HAYNES O L C

Sister Olive Lilian Creswell Haynes
Australian Army Nursing Service, AIF

Olive Lilian Creswell Haynes was born in Adelaide on 7January 1888 to Reverend James Crofts Haynes and Emma Haynes (née Creswell). She was educated at Tormore House in North Adelaide, where she developed early interests in the arts and social issues. Beyond her keen interests in reading, music, and sometimes painting, she also developed a strong concern for the lives and welfare of others. In October 1909 she began three years of training as a nurse at Adelaide Hospital. Upon finishing, she worked at the hospital as a charge nurse from February to December 1913. Haynes spent the following months working as a private nurse and travelling until she enlisted in the Australian Army Nursing Service in August 1914, aged 26.

The attestation papers of Sister Olive Haynes.

Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: B2455, HAYNES O L C

The attestation papers of Sister Olive Haynes.

Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: B2455, HAYNES O L C

Medical supplies waiting to be loaded aboard hospital ship Kyarra in Melbourne, December 1914.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P00356.003

Haynes departed from Adelaide on 26 November 1914 for Melbourne, where she boarded the SS Kyarra on 5 December. Following a stopover in Fremantle, Western Australia, Kyarra arrived in Alexandria on 13 January 1915. A week later, Haynes began duty with No. 2 Australian General Hospital (2 AGH) at Mena House, previously a tourist hotel. The initial months were not particularly busy, though there were increasing cases of smallpox, measles, pneumonia and later cholera. 

Tug-of-war games aboard Kyarra.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial H02021

Christmas dinner about to be served on SS Kyarra, 25 December 1914.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial H02026

SS Kyarra berthed at Alexandria, early 1915.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial A04528

Soldiers from Gallipoli being transferred to a hospital train, Alexandria, Egypt, 1915.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial H12939

The real test for Haynes came in late April when casualties from the Gallipoli landings began to arrive. On 29 April she recorded in her diary: ‘over 2,000 landed at Alexandria’. 2 AGH became so overcrowded that in May a second hospital was opened in the nearby Ghezireh Palace Hotel. For the next four months, staff ferried between the two sites, struggling to contend with continual arrivals of several hundred cases at a time. In addition to wounded soldiers, many were victims of the typhoid and dysentery spreading through the trenches. Their infections were exacerbated by the severe heat and the huge numbers of flies. Haynes described a ‘[g]hastly smell like decomposing mummies’ in the hospital. In a letter to her sister on 16 July, she wrote: 

We got 300 more in today, so now we have about 600 between the two of us [Mena and Ghezireh]. They can’t sleep for the heat and wander about and smoke and scratch; the sandflies are beyond anything.

Long and arduous shifts in these conditions took their toll on the insufficient staff. On 25 May, Haynes recorded:

On all day … Hotter and hotter. The insects are the limit. Night duty tonight at 12.00. I’m sure I’ll never get up. Never felt so tired in my life.

Although granted one week of respite in Alexandria from 2 to 9 August, she returned to the massive casualties from the August offensive on Gallipoli. On 11 August she wrote,Another convoy 400 … Didn’t get off until 2.30 am – on again at 7.00 – very busy.’ Overworked and weak, many nurses also became ill – Haynes referred to a number of sisters who died from infections such as septicaemia.

As the offensive concluded, Haynes elected to transfer to the island of Lemnos. After enjoying a day of leave to shop at bazaars, visit the zoo, and dine at the popular Groppi restaurant in Cairo, she left Egypt aboard SS Assaye on 15 September. 

Haynes landed at Mudros, the central harbour at Lemnos, on 18 September 1915. Located less than 100 kilometres from the Gallipoli peninsula, Mudros had become a major staging and medical base for the campaign. Although conditions at Lemnos had improved slightly since No. 1 Australian Stationary Hospital’s arrival in March, they were still austere in September. Haynes joined No. 2 Australian Stationary Hospital and found serious shortages in tents and beds as hospital ships with up to 700 casualties arrived at the harbour. She observed ‘poor old chaps lying everywhere’, suffering further because of inadequate water supplies and terrible sanitation. Haynes herself endured ramshackle tents, half rations and ailments such as neuralgia, lumbago and dysentery.

Conditions only worsened as winter approached, bringing with it severe winds and rain. The 1915 November and December blizzards caused particular hardships, as well as a surge in the number of frostbite victims from Gallipoli. 

Listen to Sister Haynes describe, in her diary entries and letters home, the privations she suffered as a nurse on Lemnos and the treatment of frostbite victims:

We left Assaye in a barge and arrived at a little landing-place on 18 September … Everybody was so pleased to see us. We didn’t go to No. 1 Stationary Hospital after all but went to No. 2, West Australian Unit. It is such a nice little island – very barren, except for a few Greek villages dotted about. We could hear the firing from the Dards. We were on duty straight away with plenty to do. Assaye arrived in the harbour with 700 badly wounded on board. Every hospice was full and they kept coming in. There were poor old chaps lying everywhere on mattresses on ground. Water can be very scarce; sometimes you couldn’t even get a drink for a man. We couldn’t even wash the men. We eventually sent a lot off to the base. We live in tents here – eight of us in a tent – and batmen to sweep them out. Snakes, moles, scorpions and centipedes are rife. I search my bed every night and generally manage to catch something. But washing has been the great problem, sanitary arrangements are very primitive. Every morning they leave two buckets of water outside and we have a wash in enamel bowls – no baths, of course. All the water is condensed sea-water. I have to walk about half a mile to get hot water from the cookhouse. We have candles and a hurricane lamp inside. The wind blows here – hurricanes – and, when it rains, there’s mud up to your knees. We have been wearing heavy Tommy Boots. The other night we had a fine old storm – a lot of the tents fell in. Another night my bed broke in halves and I had to sleep on the floor. In the beginning I got neuralgia every night and sometimes lumbago in my back. I have had Lemnitis too, Dysentery, and been up all night. Many Sisters have been sick; one English Sister died. It has been terribly cold, absolutely the coldest days I’ve ever known. Mackintoshes and cardigans were issued but you could have everything possible on and still perish. It was hard work struggling between the tents with rain and wind blowing, snow and sleet, I nearly died. Recently men from Suvla started coming in with the most awful frost-bitten feet. It makes you sick doing them. We have never seen them in Australia so had no idea how awful they could be. They are much worse than any wounds, and several lost their legs. They had a terrible time. Men were frozen to death standing up. We expanded to over 1,000 beds but still there were men lying on the ground and everything. They were always so cheerful and good and grateful though. The poor old things, they were thankful for anything. They said it was a touch of home. I wouldn’t mind a change now – no work for a bit. A year’s active service is enough for anyone, I am beginning to think.

Owing to the successful evacuations of Gallipoli in December, work for Lemnos medical staff eventually eased. Haynes left for Egypt on 15 January 1916. After two months of comparatively quiet work at Ghezireh and Heliopolis, and three welcome days of leave at the Luxor Hotel, on 26 March she embarked on HMHS Braemer Castle for Marseilles to support troops on the Western Front. 

Haynes and other staff outside her tent at Mena House.

Courtesy of Margaret Young

Haynes in her ‘Lemnos gear’, September 1915.

Courtesy of Margaret Young

Nurses outside of their huts on Lemnos.

Courtesy of Margaret Young

Haynes with her close friend, Sister Ethel Alice Peters, riding donkeys during leave in Luxor in March 1916

Courtesy of Margaret Young

A page from Haynes’ service record, recording her arrival at Marseilles in April 1916

Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: B2455, HAYNES O L C SISTER

Haynes sent home this photograph of a severely injured patient at Boulogne in July 1916.

Courtesy of Margaret Young

Haynes spent the next two months in Marseilles with 2 AGH. With the exception of a spate of smallpox in mid-May, work was steadier here, and when not nursing she enjoyed occasional leisure time and the coastal countryside. She also made great use of her gramophone, which became a treasured source of entertainment and comfort both for her and her patients. In a letter to her mother on 14 April, she explained how ‘The men simply love it, and I have to promise it days ahead to different huts and tents.’

Haynes’ time in Marseilles contrasted with her next placement, in Boulogne, where she joined No. 13 Stationary Hospital (13 SH) on 14 June. Within days of commencing work there, she recorded arrivals of up to three convoys in one day flooding into the hospital. Large numbers of casualties continued to arrive for weeks, and many suffered from particularly severe wounds. In a letter to her parents on 16 July, Haynes wrote:

Convoys of wounded coming in all the time and, poor dears, they are so badly wounded … Both legs, an arm, head and back [wounds] all on one man is quite common, and such a lot dying.

In another letter to her mother, she explained that 13 SH received ‘all the worst wounds’ because it specialised in surgical cases:

They have a special Jaw Ward here, where they have all the smashed-up faces, and really they do wonders. They have a special French sculptor – most frighteningly clever – who makes new jaws and noses and faces.

In August, Haynes was transferred from Boulogne to aid the newly established No. 2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station (2 ACCS). Situated close to the front line at Trois Arbres, 2 ACCS was very vulnerable to enemy attacks. On 25 August, soon after her arrival, Haynes wrote to her mother:

We had a bit of excitement the other morning picking up bits of shell and shrapnel which landed just outside the tent … The aeroplanes are always flying around here above us and, as soon as the Germans spot them, they open fire and we do the same when theirs appear. There is a huge gun (14 ins.) just near us … when it fires the windows smash in the houses around and everything shakes.

Only days later the hospital’s war diary recorded:

Half a shell from one of our anti-aircraft guns landed just outside camp in field … applying for helmets for personnel.

While at 2 ACCS, Haynes also first spoke of having to deal with the deaths of her patients, many of whom she had become close to. In a letter to her mother on 12 September, she wrote:

They call dying ‘going west’ … We always write to their mothers if they die. I have had some of the sweetest letters from the poor mothers … it is so sad to see them die … You’d give anything or do anything to save them.

Harrowing moments were not confined to the hospital. In another letter to her parents on 24 October, she wrote:

Sister Dickson and I had such a sad experience the other day … we heard a machine gun and, looking up, saw a Bosch aeroplane firing on the Observation Balloon, and it sent a bullet … bang – into the balloon, and in two seconds the whole thing was on fire and coming down. It made us feel sick to watch it … We hurried to the fallen balloon in time to see the officer put on a stretcher … It did give us a shock, as he was the very officer who had asked us to tea. He died about five minutes after … It was so sad. He was only about 21, and such a nice man … These things happen every day up this way, we know, but it’s different when you see it and anyone you know.

But Haynes also had some good fortune during this period. In early December 1916 her diary first made reference to an Australian soldier named Pat, later explained to be Norval Henry ‘Pat’ Dooley. After frequent entries in the following weeks about their time spent together, Haynes wrote to her parents on 30 December that she and Dooley were engaged. Their relationship would continue throughout the war, through written correspondence and occasional meetings in France and England.

After two weeks of leave in London during January 1917, Haynes moved on to Wimereux to work again with 2 AGH. Now located near Boulogne, 2 AGH was a large central hospital which treated thousands of patients and evacuated many back to England. Haynes remained there until the end of the year, observing at first hand the developments on the Western Front. On 8 June, the day after the allied success at Messines, she wrote:

The news has been great the last two days. The men are coming in all the time and they are very bucked. The Irish and the New Zealand[ers] reckon they pulled this last stunt off. Of course, the Aussies helped.

However, she and 2 AGH soon faced casualties arising from initial stages of the terrible fighting at Ypres and Passchendaele. She wrote to her mother on 19 August, ‘[w]e are very busy again. Kept going pretty well all the time’. Medical staff were among the victims she treated. Haynes explained:

Fritz has been very busy shelling the C.C.S.’s [Casualty Clearing Stations]. Ever so many Sisters have been wounded and some killed. There were a few brought up the other day and one has lost an eye and the other eye has almost gone. 

Haynes herself experienced serious enemy fire at 2 AGH. By September 1917, evening bombings around the hospital were frequent, forcing staff to work in darkness in an attempt to remain concealed. In a letter to her mother towards the end of month, she wrote:

Fritz … came over again tonight. Some raid, too – bombs were dropping like one thing and guns going and shrapnel dropping on the roof. The poor patients, naturally, got the wind up.

She ended the letter by noting, ‘I am sending my will home, as we are supposed to make one.’

Haynes had a reprieve of sorts when she fell ill with bronchitis in October, leaving 2 AGH for treatment at the nearby No. 14 British General Hospital. By November, she had recovered and was transferred to Britain, where she spent several days on leave before joining the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital in Dartford. Just a month later, on 11 December, she and Pat Dooley were married in Oxford. For Haynes, this meant that she would soon have to return home to Australia – at the time, women who married during active service were forced to resign from the AIF. 

Second Lieutenant ‘Pat’ Dooley, 22nd Battalion, AIF.

Courtesy of Margaret Young

The entrance to 2 AGH at Wimereux, near Boulogne, c. 1917.

Courtesy of the Australian War Memorial P02804.002

A page from Haynes’ service record, indicating her resignation from the AIF in London on 11 December 1917

Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: B2455, HAYNES O L C SISTER

After the war, Haynes and Dooley started a life together in Melbourne, Victoria, Dooley’s home town. Over the next 60 years they raised a family of seven children and 17 grandchildren. Their home in Ivanhoe became known for its open doors to those in need, particularly during the Great Depression. Frequently they offered shelter, meals, and money to men who had lost their jobs, homes or health. Haynes also provided free medical assistance in the neighbourhood.

Haynes pursued a number of projects beyond the home. Perhaps most notably, she was instrumental in establishing a school for people with intellectual disabilities at Ivanhoe, in north eastern Melbourne. Their second daughter, Phyll, had Down Syndrome, and rather than concealing the condition Haynes encouraged open and strong support. Around 1940, she and another mother of children with intellectual disabilities began a small ‘school’ in their own homes, which came to accommodate 12 children. The school provided great support not only for the children, but also for their parents, and raised awareness about intellectual disabilities in the community. In the late 1940s the school moved to St George’s Sunday School Hall, in Ivanhoe East. From there it evolved rapidly, growing in size and gaining more experienced teachers. In the early 1950s it became the Helping Hand Association in Heidelberg, eventually catering for 60 children. In 1976, it developed into the Ivanhoe and Diamond Valley Centre for Intellectually Disabled Adults. For the rest of her life, Haynes continued to support the Centre with various fundraising activities.

Haynes’ work at the school was accompanied by a range of other voluntary roles. She worked full-time assisting war efforts during the Second World War – repairing and classifying books with the Australian Comforts Fund, rolling bandages for the Red Cross, and acting as a Voluntary Aid Detachment member with the Women’s Hospital. She also worked with Save the Children, and was active in fundraising for the church. Her efforts coordinating raffles, fêtes, and donating goods continued to within months of her death. Haynes died on 10 April 1978, aged 90, and her husband Pat just five months later.

References

Australian War Memorial, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-1918 War, AWM4 Subclass 26/63 - No 2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station

Bassett, J 1992, Guns and Brooches: Australian Army Nursing from the Boer War to the Gulf War, Oxford, Melbourne

Butler, AG (ed.) 1930, Official History of the Australian Army Medical Services in the War of 1914-1918, vol. I, Australian War Memorial, Melbourne

Butler, AG (ed.) 1940, Official History of the Australian Army Medical Services in the War of 1914-1918, vol. II, Australian War Memorial, Melbourne

Harris, K 2011, More than Bombs and Bandages: Australian Army Nurses at Work in World War I, Big Sky Publishing Pty Ltd, Newport

National Archives of Australia: Australian Imperial Force, Base Records Office; B2455, Olive Lilian Creswell Haynes’ First Australian Imperial Force personnel dossier, 1914-1920; HAYNES O L C SISTER, 1914-1920

Young, M (ed.) 1991, ‘We are here, too’, 2nd edn, Australian Down Syndrome Association Incorporated, Adelaide

Olive and Pat (centre) with Pat’s sister and mother, and Olive’s sister, February 1919.

Courtesy of Margaret Young

ANN

PROUD OF YOUR PROFESSION, SISTER HAYNES

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Roscoe Blue

Such courage in the face of unimaginable horrors; such compassion. All we can do is honour all who sacrificed so that we live well in freedom so courageously won. Thank you.

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Anonymous

Such courage in the face of unspeakable hardship and deprivation; such compassion unflinchingly given, can never be repaid and, yet, we can only acknowledge with grateful hearts.

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CHELLE

WELL DONE IN SUCH DIRE CIRCUMSTANCES

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jean gledhill

we remember you too for your compassion and support of the brave men. you suffered too.

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Anonymous

you are an amazing woman, God rest your soul xx

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Anonymous

You’re Wonder Woman. I salute you.

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Anonymous

Hi, I have been learning a lot about you and I think you were very brave to even think about going to war. I wish you could tell me all about what happened in the war.

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Anonymous

thank you for your sacrifice

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Anonymous

you did a wonderful job.

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0livia wheatley

You are a great nurse; thank you

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Anonymous

I congratulate your work as a nurse and am happy you lived after the war and got married to a nice man.  you are a life saver.

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Abby

On behalf of all the soldiers you tended to, thank you. Without nurses like you so many more soldiers would have fallen. REST IN PEACE XX

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Amelia

Thank you for looking after our wounded solders

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MEL

THANK YOU

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a

Amazing story. rip

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Annabella

thank you for helping others

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Anonymous

you were very brave

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Anonymous

you are very strong and brave - you are lucky to survive. LEST WE FORGET.

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Anonymous

you are a very brave woman and are lucky. Did you have a choice to go to war?

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Anonymous

Would love to have half as much courage as you, Sister Olive. Thank you for what you did for this great country so I have the life I live today. Lee

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emma middleton

your courage has taught me a big lesson and I will always believe in you

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holly

thank you for helping the soldiers

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Anonymous

You sounded like a great nurse. If I could I would like to meet you so much. You must be the greatest,  Holly

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Alisha

Thank you for using your time to help others. You are a truly amazing person.

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Rosie

You must have been a really good nurse. Rest In Peace.

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Anonymous

You are an inspiration to me. Thank You

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Anonymous

i have missed you. i will be happy to see you. i hope you will be tot - i made a new friend she and i are nurses .

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Anonymous

THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR EFFORTS AND MAKING OUR COUNTRY AS PEACEFUL AND BEAUTIFUL. THANK YOU

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Anonymous

Thank you for fighting. You changed the future for all of us. Thanks for being such an amazing person. Thank you so much.

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Anonymous

you did a great job. It was funny when you said i have to check my bed every night for snakes and other creatures

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Anonymous

you girls did a great job. it was funny when you said i had to check your bed every night for snakes and other creatures. from liv

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Anonymous

lest we forget

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Anonymous

THANK YOU will never be enough

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Anonymous

did you like being engaged to someone who was in the war?

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Anonymous

thank you for being a nurse

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Anonymous

I have enjoyed learning about your historical life.  Thank you for doing what you could to help/save the soldiers who fought in the war.

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Anonymous

I hope you made it back safe LOVE  ISABELLA

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Anonymous

I HOPE YOU MADE IT THERE WELL

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Anonymous

Amazing lady, inspirational life! :)

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mel

what an incredible woman and pioneer for female professionals around Australia

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Anonymous

Thank you for your service.

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]ysbeth

thank you for giving up your life to nurse our country in the war. you will always be remembered by us in Australia for years to come.

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jill

my great aunt lucy may pitman followed in your footsteps. inspirational women, ahead of your time.

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Anonymous

You lived an adventurous life. You're my idol because you helped so many people. Thank you.

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leanne armstrong

thank you

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Anonymous

Thank you for sharing your story with me...brings me to tears in awe.

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Anonymous

Your work as a nurse in Egypt has been an inspiration down the generations. Nursing on with care and dedication...

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Anonymous

thank you for your great courage, care and love for your patients

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Rosie

I am very happy the way you helped australia

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